Brothers of dad who died of brain tumour on 28th birthday continue charity work in his honour

Simon and Andrew Dixon at the end of their 160 mile bike ride.
Simon and Andrew Dixon at the end of their 160 mile bike ride.
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The brothers of a South Tyneside man who died of a brain tumour on his 28th birthday have carried on the charity work he began through a huge physical feat.

Scott Dixon was diagnosed with a tumour on his brain stem back in June 2012 - on the same day his mum Jackie was told she was clear of breast cancer.

Jackie Dixon with her late son Scott.

Jackie Dixon with her late son Scott.

The personal trainer had not felt unwell, but the illness was found when his brother Andrew made him an eye appointment when he began to suffer double vision.

The dad-of-two, from South Shields, underwent a series of scans, which found the cancer could not be operated on, but rounds of radiotherapy and then chemotherapy successfully shrank the tumour.

But more than four years after he was first told of his illness, his condition deteriorated, leading him to lose his speech and hearing and in time he was unable to walk.

He was given respite at the Marie Curie hospice in Newcastle, care his family say was priceless in helping him and his loved ones, and last October he returned home where he spent time with his family before he died on his birthday, just two days after Christmas.

It just means Scott’s name is being kept alive and he would have been delighted and so proud of his brothers and all their friends.

Jackie Dixon

Now five months on, his grieving brothers Simon, 38, and Andrew, 37, and 15 of their friends have completed a 160 mile C2C bike ride from Barrow-in-Furness in Cumbria to a finishing point at the Sanddancer pub in South Shields - including a gruelling climb to the 1,732ft summit of Tan Hill in the Yorkshire Dales along the way - for the charity which had helped out Scott.

The Toma Fund had helped cover the cost of car repairs to help him reach his hospital appointments, as well as other support, when he was diagnosed.

Scott, who worked at the Fitness Rooms, in Benton, returned the gesture by raising money for the charity when he was well through his bootcamps and asking his clients to raise cash through the Great North Run for the charity.

So far, they have raised more than £1,500 for the North East charity, which was set up in memory of Jordan Thompson and Sophie Ela Atay, who were cousins who died of childhood cancers and is headed up by Jordan’s mum Andrea.

Simon and Andrew Dixon take a breather at Tan Hill on their C2C bike ride.

Simon and Andrew Dixon take a breather at Tan Hill on their C2C bike ride.

Jackie, 59, from Westoe Crown Village, said: “I am over the moon and I could cry thinking about it.

“It makes me so proud of the boys, they were all so close, and they miss Scott so much, but they are doing this for him, as well as for Andrea and the Toma Fund.

“It just means Scott’s name is being kept alive and he would have been delighted and so proud of his brothers and all their friends.

“Andrea came to Scott’s funeral and was talking to Andy and Simon and they said they wanted to take it up where Scott had left off.

The cyclists who took part in the C2C in memory of Scott Dixon.

The cyclists who took part in the C2C in memory of Scott Dixon.

“Scott never missed work until right up to the end.

“When he would have treatment for one week and go back for the next three.

“He didn’t want to come home from the hospice until he was well enough.

“In November time, we would watch the Christmas movies and we had some lovely times together, and his brothers, his kids and his nieces and nephews would all come round, they just adored him.”

In addition to Jackie, Andrew and Simon, who both work as engineers, Scott left his children Lewis, nine, and Scarlett, four, Simon’s wife Julie and their children, twins Thomas and Louis, 12, and Paddy, 18, and Andrew’s wife Emma and their children Peyton, three, and Cole, nine months.

Andrea added: “I’m over the moon and overwhelmed that they have done this for us.

Jackie Dixon and her late son Scott.

Jackie Dixon and her late son Scott.

“They must be still grieving deeply, but they’ve decided to do something like this and I just think it’s a fantastic, amazing and phenomenal thing to do.

“I think they are selfless people who are doing something to make other people’s lives better and it is such a physical challenge for them to take on.”

Donations can still by made via http://bit.ly/2plKf7J