Nine ways the iPhone has changed our lives in the last 10 years

The iPhone has helped make Apple the most valuable company in the world. It celebrates its 10th anniversary tomorrow.
The iPhone has helped make Apple the most valuable company in the world. It celebrates its 10th anniversary tomorrow.

The iPhone, the device which redefined the mobile phone and helped make Apple the most valuable company in the world, marks its 10th anniversary tomorrow.

It was on January 9, 2007, that late Apple founder and chief executive Steve Jobs went on stage at the company's Macworld event to announce the tech giant was to reveal "an iPod, a phone and an internet communicator" - but rather than three separate products being revealed, one of the first truly smart phones was unveiled.

Apple has sold more than one billion iPhones around the world.

Apple has sold more than one billion iPhones around the world.

Since then, Apple has sold more than one billion iPhones around the world and has become one of the wealthiest companies ever.

The iPhone has had a dramatic impact on everyday life . Here's nine ways it has changed our lives:

1. A new way of using a computer - the screen keyboard meant people had to learn to swipe their telephones instead of hitting a physical keyboard. Predictive-text, spell check plus cutting and pasting were introduced. It helped trigger a new trend for touchscreen products.

2. The App Store - this simple way to buy and download an array of applications was introduced in 2008 and meant people could tailor the iPhone to their own needs. It created a new focus for software developers who looked to create for mobile devices rather than programmes for Windows desktop and laptop computers.

The iPhone, the device which redefined the mobile phone and has helped make Apple the most valuable company in the world, marks its 10th anniversary on Monday.

The iPhone, the device which redefined the mobile phone and has helped make Apple the most valuable company in the world, marks its 10th anniversary on Monday.

3. Siri - Apple describes Siri as "the intelligent personal assistant that helps you get things done". Sending messages, placing calls and checking the calendar are among the tasks Siri can do once the voice-recognition technology is mastered. Users learned to speak commands and questions instead of of tapping them in on the screen.

4. The 64-bit A7 processor - Apple was the first company to get a powerful 64-bit processor into a smartphone. Rivals branded it a gimmick while Apple claimed the processor was of "desktop-grade". Apple had put its developers at the forefront of the long-term challenge to boost performance - even though having smartphones with 4GB of RAM was still a distant reality when this processor was introduced.

5. Touch ID - A fingerprint can be used to unlock Apple's iPhone and iPad. The iPhone 5 was the first device to feature the fingerprint scanner.

6. 3D Touch - This pressure-sensitive screen technology, unveiled in 2015, was aimed at allowing users to call up different functions by pressing screens firmly. Apple said it "transformed" the experience of using the telephone, making it easier to use and switch between apps. It could be pressed in to action to preview an email or photograph, swap weapons in a video game and switch into selfie photograph mode.

7. Reviving an industry - the past decade has seen new developments in mobile operating systems, the production of touchscreen smartphones and tablets. Technology analyst Ian Fogg said: "10 years ago when people brought out consumer computing devices or home appliances, if they connected to any device at all it had to be connected to a PC ... but now everyone is connected to an iPhone. The telephone is essential to everything now."

8. Boosting other industries - the iPhone opened up doors for other types of businesses such as Uber and Rovio, which makes the Angry Birds game.

9. The supply-chain comes under the spotlight - with the iPhone helping to drive Apple's power in the world of technology came greater scrutiny and high-profile activism over how electronics are made. Campaigners criticised the Foxconn plants in China that produce Apple's iPhones, iPads and other products for poor working conditions, long hours and low wages. Apple banned the use of bonded labour in its factories. This saw new workers charged a fee - sometimes equivalent to a month's salary or more - for being introduced to a factory.

Analysts have referred to the device as a cultural icon and most modern smartphones have been inspired by the iPhone in some form.

The next version of the iPhone, which is expected to be unveiled in September, has already been rumoured to feature a larger screen which covers the majority of the front of the device.