DCSIMG

Stranded ship to switch sides on river

HEADING SOUTH ... the Donald Duckling was held on the Tyne in November after being found in an appalling state of disrepair. She is being moved to a South Shields berth.

HEADING SOUTH ... the Donald Duckling was held on the Tyne in November after being found in an appalling state of disrepair. She is being moved to a South Shields berth.

A SHIP which has been stranded on the Tyne for almost two months is expected to move to the south side of the river later this week.

The Panama-registered Donald Duckling has been held at the port since the middle of November by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency because of safety concerns.

The action was taken when it was found to be in an “appalling” state of disrepair.

The largely Filipino crew were flown home last week after spending Christmas on the vessel, supported by a number of organisations including South Shields Mission to Seafarers.

The ship’s captain and engineer remain onboard and the vessel is expected to be taken from North Tyneside to the former McNulty yard in South Shields within the next few days.

The timing of the journey, which is expected to take about 30 to 45 minutes, will depend on weather conditions.

The transfer from the Northumbrian Quay at North Shields has been taken by the Port of Tyne for logistical reasons. The quay is used for a variety of vessels, including the berthing of cruise ships, which will start arriving on the Tyne from March.

Port of Tyne harbour master Mike Nicholson said: “We are making alternative lay-by provision for the Donald Duckling at the former McNulty quay on the south side of the river at South Shields.

“This is to avoid impact on the Port of Tyne’s operations and ensure the port’s quays remain available for all scheduled shipping.”

It is not known how long the Duckling will remain on the river.

Under marine law, the vessel will not be able to move on until all the necessary repairs are carried out.

None of those repairs have yet been undertaken by the ship’s Taiwanese owner, TMT Shipping, which is now thought to be planning to send a replacement Chinese crew to the Tyne.

The Filipinos were assisted in their repatriation by seafarers’ welfare organisation the Apostleship of the Sea (AoS), which had been providing them with practical support since the vessel’s arrest on November 12.

Their repatriation was financed by Nautilus, the International Transport Workers Federation.

The ship was meant to be collecting a cargo of scrap metal to take to Korea.

Twitter: @shieldsgazpaul

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page