New Head Boy and Girl elected at Whitburn school

Whitburn C of E Academy election of head boy and girl. From left vice chair school governor Milda Small, deputy head boy James Warren, head boy Sam Johnston,  principal Alan Hardie, head girl Kayla Wardle, deputy head girl Annisha Attanayake and chair school governor Jean Mulley

Whitburn C of E Academy election of head boy and girl. From left vice chair school governor Milda Small, deputy head boy James Warren, head boy Sam Johnston, principal Alan Hardie, head girl Kayla Wardle, deputy head girl Annisha Attanayake and chair school governor Jean Mulley

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Four school pupils have been handed an honour by their peers after being elected to represent them.

Whitburn Church of England Academy has welcomed its new Head Boy and Girl and deputies.

Whitburn C of E Academy election of head boy and girl. Head boy Sam Johnston and head girl Kayla Wardle

Whitburn C of E Academy election of head boy and girl. Head boy Sam Johnston and head girl Kayla Wardle

More than 20 pupils applied for the prestigious posts, at the school in Rackly Way, and the eight top candidates had to convince their fellow pupils they were suitable role models to represent the school.

They presented their cases to Year 9 and 10 pupils during the school’s Democracy Day programme, and pupils then voted for their favourites.

Sam Johnston was named Head Boy, with Kayla Wardle at his side as Head Girl.

James Warren was named Deputy Head Boy and Annisha Attanayake took the title of Deputy Head Girl.

During the day Year 9 pupils took part in a range of democracy-themed activities and Year 10 pupils took part in the launch of a new careers programme, Unifrog.

Following that they attended a careers fair and learned about apprenticeships, employment and further education from more than 60 different organisations.

Year 12 students attended a careers and higher education fair with a range of universities, higher level apprenticeship and gap year providers.

Alan Hardie, principal of the school, said: “The EU referendum result demonstrates the profound impact which the electorate can have on the future of a country.

“It is essential that schools engage young people in the democratic process. This election and the campaigning which preceded it helps our pupils understand how democracy works and why their votes really do matter.”