DCSIMG

A clean bill of health for Trust

TREMENDOUS PRIDE ... patient Sarah Urwin with, from left, staff nurse Rachel Moseley, student nurse Hannah Forster and staff nurse Sam Nicholson. Inset, from left, Trust community staff Sister Lynn Armstrong, community matron John Conlon, district nurse and safe care lead Diane Shotton, acute care team staff nurse Briony Sim, healthcare assistant Julia Edwards and senior practitioner Matthew Brooksbank.

TREMENDOUS PRIDE ... patient Sarah Urwin with, from left, staff nurse Rachel Moseley, student nurse Hannah Forster and staff nurse Sam Nicholson. Inset, from left, Trust community staff Sister Lynn Armstrong, community matron John Conlon, district nurse and safe care lead Diane Shotton, acute care team staff nurse Briony Sim, healthcare assistant Julia Edwards and senior practitioner Matthew Brooksbank.

SOUTH Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust was found to be meeting all essential standards of quality and safety when the Care Quality Commission (CQC) carried out its most recent, unannounced, routine inspection.

Trust Chief Executive Lorraine Lambert said: “I am delighted that the CQC team was able to see at first hand the efforts of staff to provide our patients with the best possible experience.

“It is a source of tremendous pride to see patients using words like ‘exceptional’, ‘awesome’, ‘respectful’ and ‘very caring and supportive’ to describe our staff in the CQC’s report on their visit.”

During a three-day visit, the CQC’s team rigorously assessed standards at South Tyneside District Hospital, and in community health services which the Trust runs in Gateshead, Sunderland and South Tyneside, in relation to:

* Respecting and involving people who use services

* Care and welfare of people who use services

* Assessing and monitoring the quality of service provision

* Accuracy and confidentiality of patient records

* Requirements relating to the workforce.

They were supported on the inspection by an ‘expert-by-experience’ – a person with personal experience of using or caring for someone who uses the relevant care service.

As well as observing how patients were being cared for and talking with them and their carers, and with staff, they spoke to people in the community and voluntary sector and were given information by the local Healthwatch.

Areas they visited included A&E, children’s services, Outpatients, cancer services, elderly care wards and community nursing. In determining that all the standards inspected were met, they said that patients’ needs were assessed and their treatment plans were discussed with them. Patients told them that they felt well informed about what was happening regarding their care and discharge arrangements and, overall, they said the care and treatment they received was good.

Regarding the ‘Respecting and involving people who use services’ standard, the CQC concluded in their report that people’s rights to dignity were upheld and the Trust promoted choice for people and provided them with information about their treatment and condition.

The CQC added: “Patients’ diversity, values and human rights were respected.

“We noted the environment supported patients’ privacy. We saw that patients were accommodated in single sex bays in the ward areas we visited.

“Toilets and bathrooms were designated for male or female. We observed that personal care and consultations were conducted in private, with fixed screening used at the bedside.”

In respect of the standard relating to the care and welfare of people using services, the CQC considered patients did receive effective, safe and appropriate care, treatment and support which ensured their specific needs were met and their rights protected.

On the in-patient wards they toured, they observed a system involving staff making regular checks to ensure that patients were safe and receiving the right care and support. This included two-hourly ward rounds, during which staff were available to speak to patients and relatives about any care issues they wished to discuss.

The report added: “Most patients we spoke with had positive comments about their care experience and described staff as ‘wonderful’ and ‘providing good care’. Patients told us the nursing and medical staff gave them information about their condition and they were given plenty of opportunity to ask questions and had their questions answered in a way that they understood.”

The parents of a baby in the Special Care Baby Unit told the assessors: “Nothing could be better; they have been awesome’.

In relation to assessing and monitoring the quality of service provision, in their report the CQC described the hospital as being ‘well-led’. The quality of service offered was regularly monitored and processes were in place to identify, assess and manage risks relating to the health, welfare and safety of patients and staff.

In terms of patient records, the CQC’s inspectors considered that accurate records relating to patient care and treatment were held securely.

They said: “In all areas we visited, records relating to patient care and treatment had been satisfactorily completed, whether electronically or in paper format.” When they looked at the requirements relating to the workforce, they were satisfied that there were effective recruitment and selection procedures in place to ensure patients were cared for by properly qualified staff so their protection and wellbeing were assured.

Mrs Lambert added: “The extremely positive outcome of this inspection is a tribute to our staff’s dedication and commitment to providing fantastic care, 24/7.

“However, while it is reassuring to receive such feedback about our staff and services, we are never complacent and we will continue to take every opportunity to improve services.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page