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Clinic boss hits back at Kerry Katona ‘vampire facelift’ claim

NOTHING OUT OF ORDINARY ... South Shields clinic boss James Wilde has defended his business after Kerry Katona, pictured below, spoke out against it.

NOTHING OUT OF ORDINARY ... South Shields clinic boss James Wilde has defended his business after Kerry Katona, pictured below, spoke out against it.

A CLINIC boss from South Tyneside has hit back at claims by singer Kerry Katona that a cosmetic procedure left her looking “like the Elephant Man”.

The Atomic Kitten star says her face swelled up after she had a Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) or “vampire facelift” done at ReVamp clinic in Jesmond, Newcastle.

But James Wilde, a director of the firm who lives in South Shields, says that the star’s initial reaction to the “facial rejuvenation” technique was nothing out of the ordinary.

He also says the reality TV star had been warned about the potential recovery time.

He said: “We discussed the treatment with Kerry beforehand and she was warned that the body’s reaction to the treatment is very individual and it could take up to three days for swelling to subside.

“The treatment was carried out successfully and aftercare was discussed at length, with cold gel packs provided to reduce swelling.

“Unfortunately, within hours of the treatment it became apparent that Kerry was extremely anxious about the after-effects and no amount of reassurance from ourselves, or from a PRP specialist doctor that we arranged to speak to her GP, was able to allay her fears.”

Safety

Describing her “ordeal” the mother-of-four said she was afraid to go to sleep as she was “scared I would never wake up” and that – five days after undergoing the supposedly anti-ageing treatment – she still felt so battered that she went to her GP for steroids to reduce the puffiness.

Mr Wilde added: “The safety of our patients is paramount and if we had thought for a moment that Kerry was at any risk, we would have advised immediate emergency medical intervention. However, this was not the case.  

“An independent outside PRP specialist spoke to Kerry’s GP and he confirmed that her symptoms were confined to minor heat and swelling in her cheeks, which is entirely what we would expect. 

“Her GP was advised not to prescribe anything except anti-histamine.”

The procedure sees 20ml of blood drawn from the patient and spun to separate the plasma and platelets from the other blood components.

The plasma and concentrated platelets are then re-introduced into sites of injuries, scars, skin, obvious lines or wrinkles.

Research and clinical data show PRP obtained from the patient’s own blood is safe, with very minimal risk of adverse reactions or complications.

Because the platelets are produced from the patient’s own blood, there is no risk of rejection or disease transmission.

Twitter: @shieldsgazvicki

 

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