DCSIMG

Hospital passes ‘secret visit’ test

winning team ... Bevv Atkinson, executive director nursing and patient safety, left, and Helen Ray, chief operating officer, clinical services, with some of the staff at South Tyneside District Hospital.

winning team ... Bevv Atkinson, executive director nursing and patient safety, left, and Helen Ray, chief operating officer, clinical services, with some of the staff at South Tyneside District Hospital.

HOSPITAL standards in South Tyneside have passed the test after a mystery visit by health watchdogs.

Inspectors from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) paid a visit to South Tyneside District Hospital in South Shields to check how patients were being looked after.

The review team visited a number of surgical and medical wards and departments, including orthopaedics, gynaecology, elderly care, stroke services, A&E, outpatients and the emergency assessment unit.

A report after the two-day visit to the hospital in Harton Lane, South Shields, has now deemed that all essential standards were met.

Lorraine Lambert, South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust chief executive, said: “We were not told in advance about the CQC’s visit and I am delighted that they were satisfied that we were meeting these extremely important standards.

“Our staff do a fantastic job, 24 hours a day, every single day of the year, and many of our patients tell us how grateful they are for the care they receive, but it is very gratifying – and reassuring for our local population – to have official confirmation.

“We believe that every patient has the right to receive high-quality care that is safe, effective and respects their privacy and dignity and we are always looking at how we can improve care and the patient’s experience.

“Whilst the CQC’s findings, overall, were very positive we will be scrutinising them further for any areas where we can make improvements.”

The inspection found the hospital was meeting required standards in five categories: respecting and involving people, the care and welfare of people using services, safeguarding people from abuse, supporting workers, and assessing and monitoring the quality of service provision.

The CQC, which carried out its visit in October, highlighted the “calm and controlled atmosphere” on the wards and said ward areas were clean and well-maintained. They found that patients’ needs were assessed, their treatment plans were discussed with them and a thorough system of checks to monitor the quality of the care provided at ward level was in place.

Patients told inspectors that the care and treatment they received was good and that they felt informed about what was happening regarding their care and arrangements for discharge from hospital. Staff also said they felt supported in the workplace and that there were systems in place to ensure training and professional development at all levels.

Twitter: @shieldsgazvez

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page