Mayor of South Tyneside backs new mental health film

The Mayor of South Tyneside, Coun Fay Cunningham, and Mayoress Stella Matthewson meet Dr Darren Flynn, practitioner psychologist at Newcastle University, Dan Nesbitt, script writer, and Caroline Hall from Public Health South Tyneside prior to the screening.
The Mayor of South Tyneside, Coun Fay Cunningham, and Mayoress Stella Matthewson meet Dr Darren Flynn, practitioner psychologist at Newcastle University, Dan Nesbitt, script writer, and Caroline Hall from Public Health South Tyneside prior to the screening.

The Mayor of South Tyneside has shown her support for a mental health support group.

Coun Fay Cunningham attended the screening of a new film created by Newcastle University at South Shields Central Library’s theatre.

This is an important development in mental health services, and it is great we could promote this in South Tyneside, especially during Mental Health Awareness Week.

Bill Scott, South Tyneside Mental Health User Voice

The film, made in partnership with users of the mental health charity Moving Forward Newcastle, is intended to raise awareness among the public and medics about the value of shared decision-making in helping people recover from mental health problems.

The screening at the Prince Georg Square library attended by Coun Cunningham, along with mayoress Stella Matthewson, was held as part of Mental Health Awareness Week.

Bill Scott, of South Tyneside Mental Health User Voice, said: “This is an important development in mental health services, and it is great that we could promote this in South Tyneside, especially during Mental Health Awareness Week.”

Former heavyweight boxer Frank Bruno, a bipolar depression sufferer, is part of the cast of the film, and he is shown talking about his problems.

The main character is John, a man showing symptoms of depression, and he is shown receiving support from a friend as well as his GP as he makes a decision about the best treatment option for him.

As part of shared decision-making, patients are encouraged to consider their own values and beliefs while weighing up which treatment option is best for them.

Dr Darren Flynn, a senior research associate and practitioner psychologist at Newcastle University’s institute of health and society, said: “Empowering people with mental health problems to make informed decisions about the treatment that is right for them as individuals is an important part of the recovery process.

“Research has shown that people with mental health problems are capable and willing and, in most cases, want more involvement in decisions about their treatment than they currently receive.”

To view the film, go online and visit sdmdepression.ncl.ac.uk