DCSIMG

Revolving hospital doors will stay closed after tragedy

SLIDE RULE ... the doors on the outpatients wing at South Tyneside District Hospital will no longer be used as revolving doors. Below, Steve Jamieson, South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trusts director of corporate services.

SLIDE RULE ... the doors on the outpatients wing at South Tyneside District Hospital will no longer be used as revolving doors. Below, Steve Jamieson, South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trusts director of corporate services.

HOSPITAL bosses in South Tyneside have confirmed there are no plans to reintroduce revolving doors which led to the death of a pensioner.

Roderick Elliott, 73, died six days after being knocked over by a revolving door as he left the outpatients department at South Tyneside District Hospital.

An inquest into his death revealed he broke his thigh bone and died less than a week later from acute bronchial pneumonia – a common cause of death for elderly people incapacitated by an injury.

The assistant coroner, David Mitford, said he was going to write to the hospital trust and the door manufacturers as he was concerned there could be similar incidents elsewhere.

After the accident, hospital bosses switched the doors to a sliding mode and a safety probe was launched.

They have now confirmed that the doors – as well as ones of the same kind on another wing of the hospital in Harton Lane, in South Shields – will not be reverting to revolving.

Steve Jamieson, South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust’s director of corporate services, said: “For the immediate future, the two sets of doors in question will remain in sliding mode, we do not intend to revert the doors to revolving status at all.

“We are keen to work with the supplier of the doors, Boon Edam and/or alternative suppliers, to review what options are available to achieve the minimum heat loss from the respective buildings, without compromising on user safety.”

It was ruled that Mr Elliott, of Palm Avenue, South Shields, died as a result of an accident.

He had been visiting a stroke clinic at the hospital on October 21, 2011, when the accident happened as he left the building.

On the way out, Mr Elliott was struck by the door on his right side and knocked to the ground.

He was taken into the accident and emergency department and an X-ray revealed he had broken his femur.

Doctors operated the next day, putting a screw in his hip joint and he appeared to be making good progress after his operation.

On October 27, 2011, he was found unresponsive on the hospital ward.

A cardiac arrest call was put out and CPR was started, but without success.

Twitter: @shieldsgazvicki

 

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