Major development plans for derelict land in South Shields

Planning proposals for land off Claypath Lane have been given the green light.
Planning proposals for land off Claypath Lane have been given the green light.
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A derelict site in South Shields town centre is set for a major development after plans to create a new industrial and office complex were given the go-ahead.

The land, which was formally used by Duncan House, off Claypath Lane, is to be made into seven ground-floor units.

We welcome this private sector investment.

Coun John Anglin

The applicant, Tony Mordew, who is the director of Snugfit, aims to occupy half of the proposed units with his bathroom and kitchen business – with the remainder to be let to the open market.

The planned investment has delighted council leaders, who say it compliments the town’s 365 regeneration plan.

Coun John Anglin, Lead Member for Regeneration and Economy, said: “We welcome this private sector investment which complements the council’s investment in the town centre through the South Shields 365 regeneration masterplan.”

The application, which was passed by the council’s planning department at Jarrow Town Hall, stated: “The company is in negotiations with the local authority to relocate as part of a major town centre redevelopment.

“Snugfit Ltd therefore intends to occupy half of the proposed units, with the remainder to be let to the open market, largely aimed at trade counter users.”

The units will be arranged in two blocks facing inwards on either side of the access and parking area.

Four units are proposed along the north side, with three units along the south boundary.

The middle unit in the southern section will be set back to accommodate lager parking spaces for service vehicle use in front of the units.

Duncan House was demolished in November 2012, and since then the land has remained empty.

Built at the cost of £750,000, it was opened in 1975, and, during its later years, served as head office for Safeway and Morrisons.

Snugfit, based in Franklin Street, was one of the businesses needing to relocate to make way for a proposed new food store as part of the 365 plans.

But in January, the council revealed that the plans had been ‘deferred’ due to a change in market demand – meaning many businesses could stay put for the foreseeable future.

And last month it stated that the plan had been scrapped and no further premises on the land would be acquired.