Mum of girl injured in horror smash ‘furious’ that taxi driver is back on the roads

Taxi driver Amir Azad leaving South Tyneside Magistrates Court.
Taxi driver Amir Azad leaving South Tyneside Magistrates Court.

The mother of a little girl who was left brain damaged after a crash with a taxi says she’s “absolutely furious” that the driver is back in the profession.

Jessica Bootes was just four when she was seriously injured in a horror road crash on the A194 near Lindisfarne Roundabout, in Jarrow in March 2014.

Parents Lisa and Chris Bootes Newcastles RVI with daughter Jessica, after her accident at age four.

Parents Lisa and Chris Bootes Newcastles RVI with daughter Jessica, after her accident at age four.

The youngster, now seven, spent 11 days in a coma and had to have the left side of her skull removed, and suffered paralysis down the right side after the five-car collision.

Taxi driver Amir Azad, of Lilac Road, South Shields, smashed into the back of the family car while they were stopped at traffic lights and was fined £250 and given six penalty points at South Tyneside Magistrates Court.

South Tyneside Council later revoked his taxi license, but he has now secured one with Newcastle City Council and is working as a taxi driver.

Jessica’s mum, Lisa, from Harton, South Shields, said: “I’m absolutely furious. A court deemed him unfit to drive on the roads in South Tyneside so how can he go to Newcastle and get a licence?

“This man gets to walk about every day and get on with his life when he ruined my family’s lives.”

She added: “She can’t cope with being in a car for more than 10 minutes. She doesn’t feel safe. I get panic attacks too and can’t drive long distances.

“I’m going to fight this. I don’t care what I’ve got to do or how long it takes.”

A Newcastle City Council spokesman said: “A private hire driver’s licence application was considered and granted by the council on November 2015.

“All applications for a private hire licence must follow a robust legal framework and are considered by committee in accordance with guidelines issued by the Department for Transport and Home Office.

“Every application is subject to a rigorous checking process and is carefully considered. Convictions, cautions and driving licence endorsements are all taken into account and we rely on the Disclosure & Barring Service and DVLA vetting procedures together with advice from Northumbria Police.

Mr Azad refused to comment when he was contacted by the Gazette.