Readers give their views over government funding cuts

South Shields Town Hall

South Shields Town Hall

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Have your say

Residents in South Tyneside have reacted with anger after being told to brace themselves in the face of Government funding cuts.

Senior Labour councillors are set to discuss whether to accept a four-year financial settlement deal when they meet to debate the issue on Wednesday.

“Lose a few councillors, there’s too many per ward and get back to basics, to the days when councillors were honoured to serve the electorate, without the cash filled gravy train they’re on today!”

Heather Ditchburn Curry

If agreed, it will see a 20 per cent reduction - equating to £15m - in core funding over the period, meaning, that by 2020, the council would have £875 less to spend per household.

But residents are not impressed taking to social media to vent their frustration.

walkerchris wrote: “We can’t afford the current number of councillors. We can’t afford above inflation increases to allowances for councillors.

“We can’t afford council executives who are paid more than the Prime Minister. We can’t afford to throw money at the South Shields 365 Masterplan. We can’t afford free Summer concerts. We certainly can’t afford to heap more cuts, misery and debt on hard-working families, sick and disabled people in South Tyneside.

James Lister said: “Austerity is a political tool to cripple local authorities so the government can privatise all public sector.

“The council is on its knees and they’ve got to cut a further 20% of its budget. The government is out of touch with this policy.”

Maria Wilkinson said: “They should ease off on their unwarranted bonuses and pay rises. They shouldn’t get a bonus or rise when they are in debt.

“They are sacking staff due to not having enough money yet find money for bonus and rises its a disgrace.”

Angela Price said: “We get the cuts and MPs wages go up bet they don’t suffer.”

Heather Ditchburn Curry said: “Lose a few councillors, there’s too many per ward and get back to basics, to the days when councillors were honoured to serve the electorate”