Schoolboy’s family’s plea to back cancer charity

Scott Anderson is battling back to health from cancer of the blood.

Scott Anderson is battling back to health from cancer of the blood.

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A schoolboy who battling a rare disease which caused his bone marrow to fail is calling for people to get behind a children’s cancer charity.

Scott Anderson, seven, spent the best part of a year in Newcastle RVI’s specialist ‘bubble’ isolation unit.

Scott was only allowed limited contact with other people due to the risk of infection.

Scott was only allowed limited contact with other people due to the risk of infection.

He was admitted to the specialist ward after tests revealed he had a rare disease which had caused his bone marrow to fail.

Doctors were able to stabilise him with transfusions and he eventually underwent a bone marrow transplant after his younger sister Courtney, who was just four-years-old at the time, was found to be a match.

Now, recovering at home in Newcastle, his mum Sarah who is originally from South Shields, said: “My husband and I married and we had a wonderful day celebrating with our children and the rest of our family. After we had a few days away, we got home we noticed for the first time Scott was covered in bruises.

“He also had a rash, and I was really worried that it could be meningitis. I pushed for an appointment at the hospital to get his blood tested, as I just knew instinctively that something wasn’t right.

“This experience has made us all realise what the most important things in life are, and spending time as a family since has made us all so strong.”

Sarah Anderson

“When the results came back the doctor told me that Scott had a rare disease and explained that it had caused his bone marrow to fail.”

While a bone marrow donor was found, the youngster was placed within the bubble unit at the RVI - a special ward for children who have problems with their immune system.

Mrs Anderson added: “You are not allowed to wear outdoor clothing or even kiss them while they are in there, which was really tough. And only me and my husband, his aunt and his Nan could visit. None of his siblings were able to visit him.

“Our family was split up for the whole time that Scott was in hospital, which was really hard. I stayed with Scott, my husband had Courtney and the twins stayed with their Nan.”

The family received support from CLIC Sargent and the charity’s social worker Kirsten who helped the couple find a new home after their flat was deemed unsuitable for Scott due to the communal entrance and the increased risk of infection.

This is why as part of Childhood Cancer Awareness month, they are calling on people to get behind the charity’s plea to raise £170.

Mrs Anderson said: “Kirsten worked hard and fought daily with the housing association, the local authority and even the hospital bout this, and eventually she got us a new place so that Scott could finally come home.

“She even helped us get grants when we moved as we didn’t have enough furniture for our home as it was bigger, and Scott needed a new bed. The grant also covered things like flooring and white goods for the kitchen.

“My husband and I never did get a chance to have a honeymoon but I don’t care at all. This experience has made us all realise what the most important things in life are, and spending time as a family since has made us all so strong.

“My advice to parents in a similar situation is to accept any support that’s offered. To begin with I didn’t feel comfortable opening up to Kirsten – it’s not something I usually do but it helped. And definitely speak to CLIC Sargent as they’ll make your life so much easier.”

For information on how to support CLIC Sargent visit www.clicsargent.org.uk