Shields Ferry passengers rescued in emergency training exercise

Tynemouth RNLI all weather lifeboat and its volunteer crew join a training exercise held on the River Tyne to practice a multi-agency response to a fire on board the Shields Ferry. The ferry heads towards Viking Park accompanied by Port of Tyne pilot launch Collingwood which has a crewman carrying out boundary fire suppression with a hose. Please Credit:  Adrian Don/RNLI
Tynemouth RNLI all weather lifeboat and its volunteer crew join a training exercise held on the River Tyne to practice a multi-agency response to a fire on board the Shields Ferry. The ferry heads towards Viking Park accompanied by Port of Tyne pilot launch Collingwood which has a crewman carrying out boundary fire suppression with a hose. Please Credit: Adrian Don/RNLI

Emergency services took part in a training exercise by responding to a fire on board the Shields Ferry.

The exercise, which took place yesterday morning, was a chance for the emergency services and the Ferry crew to co-ordinate their response in the event of a major incident on the cross-Tyne passenger service.

The mock scene, in mid river, saw the Shields Ferry, Pride of the Tyne, attended by the Tynemouth RNLI all-weather lifeboat, Port of Tyne pilot boat and the Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service’s Fireboat.

The aims were to test command and control links, response times, evacuation procedures, the rescue of a trapped casualty, and the response to casualties arriving at landing points.

Nexus, the public body which owns and operates the Shields Ferry, was joined on the exercise by the Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service, Port of Tyne, the Northumbria Police Marine Division and the Tynemouth RNLI Lifeboat.

Shields Ferry Manager, Carol Timlin, said: “As a responsible ferry operator it is vital that we are ready to deal with emergency situations.

'Casualties' are evacuated from the ferry onto the RNLI lifeboat. Please Credit:  Adrian Don/RNLI

'Casualties' are evacuated from the ferry onto the RNLI lifeboat. Please Credit: Adrian Don/RNLI

“Training exercises like this allow us to work with the emergency services, the Port, and the RNLI to make sure that we are prepared in the unlikely event that a major incident occurs.

“All of the agencies involved find these type of exercises useful. We train all the time for all sorts of different eventualities. The safety of passengers and crew is our top priority at all times.”

The mock emergency began at 9.45am when the Ferry crew radioed that there was smoke coming from the engines on board the vessel.

This was followed by an engine failure and the evacuation of all the passengers on board, who were played by members of Nexus staff.

'Casualties' are evacuated from the ferry onto the RNLI lifeboat. Please Credit:  Adrian Don/RNLI

'Casualties' are evacuated from the ferry onto the RNLI lifeboat. Please Credit: Adrian Don/RNLI

A person is then reported as having jumped into the water and a search and rescue operation was practised using a dummy.

There was also a scenario included for managing the spillage of diesel oil into the river.

The crew were able to re-start the ferry’s engines and bring her back to the pontoon at Viking Park.

The final element of the scenario involved the Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service rescuing a casualty who had become trapped in the ferry’s engine room.

The scene at Viking Park. Please Credit:  Adrian Don/RNLI

The scene at Viking Park. Please Credit: Adrian Don/RNLI

The exercise was concluded and all agencies took part in a full debrief to ensure all the learning outcomes of the day were realised.

Assistant Chief Fire Officer Chris Lowther, Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service, said: “This was a unique and valuable opportunity for our staff to train in a live setting, working closely with partner agencies. By planning and practising the logistics of a scenario such as this, we are best placed to respond quickly and effectively in the event of a real incident. This exercise could save people’s lives.”

An injured 'casualty' is evacuated on a stretcher from the ferry onto the RNLI lifeboat. Please Credit:  Adrian Don/RNLI

An injured 'casualty' is evacuated on a stretcher from the ferry onto the RNLI lifeboat. Please Credit: Adrian Don/RNLI