South Tyneside vows to tackle anti-social behaviour with new legal powers

Coun Moira Smith.

Coun Moira Smith.

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New powers are being introduced in parts of South Tyneside to crack down on anti-social behaviour and nuisance behaviour.

Public Spaces Protection Orders (PSPOs) will restrict the consumption of alcohol and stop begging and the use of mechanically propelled vehicles, including mini motorbikes in public places, from tomorrow.

The new orders will be introduced in the Chichester area of South Shields as well as the town centres of South Shields, Jarrow and Hebburn, although one order will cover the whole of the borough in relation to the use of mechanically propelled vehicles.

The orders have been drawn up by South Tyneside Council and Northumbria Police, and anyone who breaches a PSPO risks a £100 fine.

Failure to pay may result in criminal proceedings with a maximum penalty of £1,000.

The orders can be enforced by the police, police community support officers and any authorised officer of the council.

Coun Moira Smith, lead member for area management and community safety, said: “These orders are another part of our strategy against anti-social behaviour.

“Anti-social behaviour can make life miserable for those affected by it and it can do considerable harm to the reputation of a place. With our summer festival now in full swing, it is important that we use all our powers to make the borough safe and welcoming for both residents and visitors alike.”

Superintendent Sarah Pitt, of Southern Area Command, said: "We know anti-social behaviour can have a detrimental effect on our communities and are committed to working with our partners and utilising the powers that we have available to tackle the issue.

"The PSPO will give the Police Officers and Council Officers the powers to remove people from the area who are in breach of the order and also fine them. We hope the use of the order will help us to curtail anti-social behaviour and give the public and residents of South Tyneside the protection they deserve from this problem."

PSPOs were introduced under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 and give councils and police additional powers and greater flexibility to tackle anti-social behaviour in defined geographical areas. They have already been implemented in many parts of the country.