A breath of fresh air

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Brexit supporters have called President Obama a nosey parker for intruding in British domestic affairs.

Their criticism came after Mr Obama explained he’d been in discussion for three years with the European Union over a trade agreement and negotiation could continue a few more years before any agreement. Therefore, if the UK decided to leave the EU they would “go to the back of the queue” when it came to trade deals.

Those impartial words were like a breath of fresh air in comparison to Brexit propaganda, which states the UK would be economically stronger outside the EU. Rather than making unsubstantiated statements Brexit should be explaining to the puzzled public how the UK would cope outside the EU.

For example, how long would Britain face economic instability while the terms of the exit is worked out?

New trade deals will have to be negotiated and Obama indicated how long they will be. What effect could these prolonged discussions have on the UK inward investment?

Freed from the EU fetters, who would stop the Government from taking more of our employment rights away?

The worried working class families – the only ones that will suffer if things go wrong– would like Brexit to explain why their positive vision of Britain outside Europe is contradictory to world experts.

The Treasury, the International Monetary Fund, London School of Economics, Centre for Economics Performance, Pricewaterhouse Coopers have all said if we pull out we will lose out.

Now, the latest one, The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development has forecast that doing a Brexit would make the economy worse off by £2,200 per household by 2020 and £3,200 by 2030.

Of course, this household coot didn’t bother millionaire Brexit Arron Banks. He was asked by the Treasury Committee if this loss of money to householders was a price worth paying. He replied: “I would say the figure was incorrect, but if it was the case, I would still advocate leaving”.

It must be nice to have a few pence in your pocket.

W Quinn