Need to work together

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I cannot hide my joy since the publication of the news about Anjem Chouday’s court hearing result.

For many years I tried to warn people of the danger of the one sided politically correct policies of various governments and do-gooders in this country.

I know we need some orders in place to stop the racist elements of our society becoming too vocal and active against the minorities in this country, and as a migrant who has lived in this country for more than 40 years, I do appreciate the tolerance and the welcoming attitude of the majority of the indigenous people in UK.

But I am against the excessive rights given to certain groups of people who decided to settle in this country and after a while forget where they come from and want to make the UK like their homeland.

People like Mr Choudary should not have been given the time to become so well known and build up an army of followers, who go on to commit atrocities.

Unfortunately, by the time these people are stopped and gagged it is too late and as their popularity has already grown.

I hope there will be a strong crackdown on the hate preachers and also a ban on the Islamic dress code for men and women at work and public offices in future.

As far as I understand cloth is just a tool like all the other tools that our forefathers invented to serve a purpose according to the availability of the material, their environment and the type of profession they were engaged in.

Therefore copying a 1,400-year-old style and material in 21st century does not make a person a good and true Muslim. The sooner they realise this the better it will be for all concerned.

I would also like to remind all those who call themselves moderate Muslims that they cannot stay quiet and do nothing when they hear or see extremist speeches or actions taking place in the name of their religion.

We all must work towards a more integrated and tolerant society and appreciate that people of this country have worked their backsides off to create a society that people like me, who cannot live in their own country, can come over and enjoy the fruit of the work done by all the decent people who made this country great.

However, at the same time we must not forget some the darker side of British history and some of the actions of politicians during the days of the Empire and how they colonised parts of the Empire.

I live with the hope of life in a just and peaceful world for our children and their future offspring.

Siamak Kaikavoosi