DCSIMG

Cop a load of paranormal tales

STRANGE FORCES ... Mike Hallowell is set to lecture about police experiencing paranormal activity.

STRANGE FORCES ... Mike Hallowell is set to lecture about police experiencing paranormal activity.

  • by MIKE HALLOWELL
 

POLICE officers are, by nature, cynical creatures.

They have to be; if they were to believe everything they were told, few people would ever be arrested, let alone charged with an offence.

Yet readers would be stunned if they knew how many police officers have been subjected to paranormal phenomena.

This year alone, I’ve been contacted by no less than 11 constables who have witnessed things beyond their understanding.

Naturally, such experients are often reluctant to be identified, but this does not impact upon the validity of their encounters.

Back in February, one officer contacted me to tell of her own UFO sighting.

She had been driving along a road in Northumberland when she saw a large, saucer-shaped object hovering in the sky approximately 100ft from the ground.

She said it was silver in colour, had what looked like a complicated array of pipes on its undercarriage, and a series of square “portholes” around its circumference.

The officer then heard a high-pitched whining noise and experienced a strange tingling sensation on the tip of her nose and her forehead.

After several seconds, the noise stopped and the object shot into the air out of sight.

One serving detective actually runs a website where sightings of UFOs by police officers are logged: www.prufospolicedatabase.co.uk.

Police officers are also no strangers when it comes to poltergeist encounters.

I have personally interviewed a number of police constables, sergeants and even a superintendent who, during their career, were called to premises where they saw objects flying around and doors opening and shutting without human assistance.

On one occasion, two officers saw a table levitate from the ground to a height of 2ft before slowly lowering to the floor.

“I’ve never seen anything like it,” one constable told me. “It was the scariest thing I’ve ever witnessed during my career”.

John Triplow and I are writing a book about a case in Essex which we’ve investigated extensively.

A police officer and her security consultant husband have been subjected to the most bizarre phenomena imaginable.

Spontaneous fires have broken out in their home, threatening messages – uttered by a weird, mechanical voice – have been left on their telephone answering machine, and, on one occasion, the husband was physically beaten up by their invisible assailant inside his car.

Fantasy? Hoax? Well, just consider this: A number of officers who visited the house – several of whom were so disturbed by what they saw that they have categorically refused to return – have agreed to be named and have provided written statements for publication.

Further, we have accumulated a veritable library of audio and video recordings of the entity in action, many of which are absolutely chilling.

The bizarre occurrences have been witnessed not only by the householders, but also by other family members, police officers, arson investigators, journalists, paranormal investigators, friends, priests, ministers and publicans, to name but a few.

What about those sceptics out there who are already rolling their eyes and planning to pour cold water on our claims before they’ve even heard the evidence?

Well, having a complete lack of facts and/or understanding rarely seems to make them hesitate before feverishly reaching for their keyboards.

The truth is that paranormal phenomena are real, hundreds of police officers have experienced them, and you now have a golden opportunity to hear about them yourself.

Interested? Then why not attend a lecture I’m giving on June 1 at Northumbria Police Headquarters, entitled Police, Poltergeists and the Paranormal?

In the talk, organised by the Northumbria Coalition Against Crime (NCAC), I’ll be examining a litany of close encounters involving police officers over the years.

For more details, ring Heather Armstrong on (01661) 868429 or e-mail Heather at heather@ncac.org.uk.

It’ll cost you a fiver to get in, but the proceeds are going to the NCAC – a worthy cause indeed

* Got a creepy story? Send it to wraithscape@mikehallowell.com

 

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