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Historic Jarrow glasses go up for auction

UNIQUE FIND ... 19th century wine glasses marking the 1830 Jarrow Colliery explosion and the gibbeting of William Jobling.

UNIQUE FIND ... 19th century wine glasses marking the 1830 Jarrow Colliery explosion and the gibbeting of William Jobling.

WINE glasses commemorating South Tyneside’s past will be sold at auction next week.

The two 19th century wine glasses commemorate the Jarrow Colliery explosion of 1830 and William Jobling, a South Shields miner and one of the last men in Britain to be hung from a gibbet.

The first of the glasses, which have an estimate of £100, carries the inscription ‘Jarrow Colliery explosion, 1830, 42 lives lost’. The second is engraved with ‘William Jobling, Gibbeted at Jarrow Slake, Aug 3rd, 1832’.

The Jarrow Colliery explosion took place on August 3, 1830, when a release of hydrogen caused a huge explosion early in the morning, killing 42 miners.

Two years later, at the height of the miners’ strikes, William Jobling was arrested for his part in the murder of a local magistrate.

Jobling had been drinking in a Jarrow pub with a friend, Ralph Armstrong, when Armstrong approached the magistrate and begged for money. When he was refused, the magistrate was beaten and later died.

Although it was believed that it was Armstrong who killed the magistrate, he escaped and Jobling was found guilty of murder.

He was sentenced to death and his body was hung on a gibbet and then suspended at Jarrow Slake for all to see.

Fred Wyrley-Birch, of Anderson & Garland, said: “It is interesting how two unlikely glasses can tell such a fascinating story.

“They were created as memories for miners who were from the area, never to forget the injustices they were put through.”

The glasses are believed to have been bought in Jarrow in the 19th century, and were uncovered during a house clearance in Scotland, in the home of a woman whose mother was born in Jarrow in 1878.

The glasses go on sale at Anderson & Garland Auctioneers in Newcastle next Wednesday.

 

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