9 South Tyneside pubs from the past - how many do you remember?

Fletcher's Inn pictured in 1966, prior to being pulled down.
Fletcher's Inn pictured in 1966, prior to being pulled down.

Following on from yesterday’s fascinating insight into the pubs of Tyne Dock, local history enthusiast Maureen Thompson today lists some of the other “watering holes” that were peppered around the area.

In conjunction with the work, as featured in The Streets of South Shields Volume 5, which was compiled by the Workers’ Education Association, I have fished out some old photos of pubs from throughout South Tyneside.

The Woodbine Hotel  pub, pictured in March 1970.

The Woodbine Hotel pub, pictured in March 1970.

Here’s Maureen’s compilation of some of the best-known Tyne Dock “boozers”:

• The North Eastern Public House, which was at 8 Slake Terrace. Originally built as the Dock Hotel.

• The Empress Hotel, which could be found at 9 Slake Terrace. It closed on January 31, 1960.

• Burton House, whose address was 18-19 Slake Terrace. This was also known as The Green Bar.

Back in 1963 the Gazette reported that Mark's & Spencer's store in King Street, South Shields, might be extended into the Scarbro Bar, which was part of the Golden Lion Hotel.

Back in 1963 the Gazette reported that Mark's & Spencer's store in King Street, South Shields, might be extended into the Scarbro Bar, which was part of the Golden Lion Hotel.

• Queen’s Head Hotel, of 32 Slake Terrace.

• Victoria Inn, situated at 2-4 Dock Street. It was nicknamed The Monkey as the landlord apparently had one as a pet. How true this is I am not sure. (Perhaps you know the truth of the matter?)

• Shakespeare Inn, at the corner of Bede Street and Frost Street. It was nicknamed The Shakey.

• Royal Oak Inn, of 19 Hudson Street. This was a very old pub which became a British restaurant and kitchen during the Second World War.

A group of men pose for the camera outside the Rose & Crown Hotel many moons ago.

A group of men pose for the camera outside the Rose & Crown Hotel many moons ago.

• Golden Fleece, this pub was later converted into houses, opposite Ford Street.

“There are a number of other pubs which I found the names of,” reveals Maureen, “but I was unable to discover much information about them. A lot of history concerning these pubs has been lost along the way.”

...Unless, of course, you can shed more light on the area’s pubs and clubs.

Please get in touch with me with your memories of the pubs which left their mark on your memory.

The Alum House pub, pictured between the wars.

The Alum House pub, pictured between the wars.

We all have our favourites, some of which are no longer with us.

Drop me a line with your most memorable “watering holes” – the buildings, the landlords/ladies and the people who used to frequent them.

The Adam and Eve public house in 1859.

The Adam and Eve public house in 1859.

What can you tell me about 'The Old Highlander in King Street?

What can you tell me about 'The Old Highlander in King Street?

The Old Mill Inn at Laygate.

The Old Mill Inn at Laygate.

The 'Queen's Head at Boldon Coilliery, pictured in 1955.

The 'Queen's Head at Boldon Coilliery, pictured in 1955.