Kerby, blocka, pussy in the corner... Do you remember these street games of the 1980s?

Footballs were needed for a good game of kerby.
Footballs were needed for a good game of kerby.

Playing outdoors might be a thing of the past for many of today’s tech-savvy kids, but there’s so many joys they’re missing out on.

While the list of games loved by us kids from the 1980s – and those who played out before us – seemed to be never ending, here’s five which always went down a treat in South Tyneside.

• Kerby

This one was never popular with neighbours who had cars.

Two kids would stand on opposite sides of the road and chuck a ball – normally a football– off their opponent’s kerb.

The aim of the game was to get a successful hit and bounce back.

There was various point scoring systems in play to crown the winner.

• Blocka

The game which was perfect for dozens of players.

An area was designated as the ‘safe zone’ and one, or perhaps if you were extra fancy, two people were ‘it’ and had to catch the others.

Looking back there seemed to be no real object of this game, except from running round and then having a much rest in the safe zone

• Pussy In The Corner

If you lived in a street with lots of cracked payments, then this game was perfect.

Players stood in square formations, based on pavement edges or cracks, and had to switch places with nearby players by ‘psssting’.

The object was to switch without the ‘cat’ spotting you and claiming your corner.

• Mother May I?

One person was mother and all of the other players were the kids.

Mam stood with her back to the wall, while the kids stood as far away as possible - but still within ear shot.

She’d then shout out various commands like ‘ five squashed tomatoes’ or ‘10 police man walks’.

Bit of a swizz this game really, as mam would always give her favourite kids the best manoeuvres so they’d reach her at the wall first and win.

• We Are The Champions

The deadliest of games, so deadly this was even banned at my primary school.

Two teams of equal numbers were needed to play.

One group, with linked arms, would shout: “Are you ready for a fight?”

The opposition then yelled back: “Yes we’re ready for a fight. We are the champions!”

No actually fighting was involved, instead one person from each team would be pushed forward for a mighty tug of war.

Sometimes the loser would have to sit out, and sometimes the winning team would claim them.

This probably caused a few dislocated shoulders and may have been the reason it was banned at my school.