Woolies’ window was a thing of wonder

FUN AND GAMES ... the window of Woolworth's, from its early days in King Street.
FUN AND GAMES ... the window of Woolworth's, from its early days in King Street.

WOW, this is a window you’d have pressed your nose against, isn’t it?

Given that the weather has taken an Arctic turn in recent days, this snowy view seems appropriately seasonal, albeit it’s a wee bit late for Christmas.

This is another of the pictures that I mentioned coming to me from a reader, all of which were taken by the South Shields photographer, the late Jimmy Cleet.

This is the window of Woolworth’s in King Street from the era when its slogan was still ‘nothing over sixpence,’ which meant anything from this display – a dressed dolly, a toy train, a xylophone or a game of snakes and ladders – really did cost you the equivalent, in today’s coinage, of only just over 2p.

In fact when this picture was taken, that was worth nearer 55p in value – still a bargain, though.

There is no actual date for this photograph. Woolworth’s came to Britain from the US just before the First World War.

Its store in King Street opened in 1921 and, despite disaster from air raids and a fire, it remained there for more than 80 years.

I suspect that this is the 1920s.

Other popular toys that year seem to have included figures of footballers and horses, tiny china tea sets, and something in a box called Our Bairn’s Stores: a toy shop, perhaps? I think I can also see spinning tops.