Cemetery building hit by Second World War bombs could be given new lease of life

The lodge at Harton Cemetery
The lodge at Harton Cemetery

A prominent South Tyneside building could be returned to its former glory – 74 years after it was partially destroyed by Hitler’s bombs.

The owners of the detached, Grade II-Listed private house, which sits at the entrance of Harton Cemetery, South Shields, want to construct a new two-storey south wing.

That part of the building was hit by a German bombing onslaught in 1944 at the height of The Second World War.

Plans submitted to South Tyneside Council show the extension would incorporate an expanded ground-floor kitchen-diner and two upper bedrooms.

Designed by architect Henry Grieves, the lodge, at the end of Cemetery Approach, was built between 1888 and 1891.

Following the Luftwaffe’s attack, the wing was lost, and south side patched up.

In the years afterwards, the council took ownership and used the building for housing.

Several alterations were made to brickwork, windows and doors which a new report says are not in keeping with its original character.

It adds: “This has unfortunately resulted in directly impacting and causing harm to the heritage, character and special interest of the dwelling.”

The lodge was granted listed status in February 1983.

Some four years ago was sold into private hands by the council.

The plans also show the existing kitchen will be changed into a bathroom and the utility room modernised and its flat roof removed and replaced with a pitch roof.

The extension and external alterations will be constructed in materials and features of the existing house to ensure the character and special interest is restored and improved.

A study has found the building has multiple potential day roost locations for bats, and has recommended up to two further surveys are carried out.

The public can comment on the proposals until next Monday – May 21.