Bungling brothers kicked down wrong door in revenge South Shields attack

editorial image

A pair of bungling brothers who kicked down the door of the wrong house in a failed attack have avoided jail.

Brian Hope, 41, and Christopher Hope, 34, had taken a 35cm metal rod and a screwdriver to a house in Wharton Street, South Shields, on August 15 this year.

Given your intoxication you went to the wrong address, which must have been very terrifying for the innocent resident, as they had no idea who you were.

Judge Edward Bindloss

The pair were looking for a rival after some earlier trouble.

Newcastle Crown Court heard how the brothers decided to pay the victim a visit to try to intimidate him.

But after drinking heavily and taking amphetamines they kicked down the door of an innocent resident.

When they realised what they had done they walked away without an explanation.

Mark Giuliani, prosecuting, said: “During the incident the pair had made quite a lot of noise and had woken up a lot of neighbours, who called the police.

“When the police arrived they found a metal rod that was nearly a foot long in the sleeve of Christopher Hope, which he said he kept there for protection.

“Brian Hope had thrown a screwdriver under a car, which the police found.”

The pair were remanded in custody and had served two months before their sentencing today.

Brian Hope, of Dean Road, South Shields, pleaded guilty to possessing an offensive weapon at an earlier hearing.

His brother, of Devonshire Street, South Shields, pleaded guilty to the same charge.

Judge Edward Bindloss told them: “The two of you were both in drink.

“Brian had taken amphetamines and Christopher had drank four litres of cider.

“Given your intoxication you went to the wrong address, which must have been very terrifying for the innocent resident, as they had no idea who you were.

“Thankfully, they did not see your weapons, and there was no physical harm done.”

Judge Bindloss sentenced each of the brothers to five months in prison, suspended for 12 months, and ordered them to pay a £900 costs.