Dad’s memory will live on as his daughter tackles Great North Run

Julie Lowe taking part in another run.
Julie Lowe taking part in another run.

A South Tyneside dad’s memory will live on as his daughter gets set to raise money for research into the disease which claimed his life.

Julie Lowe is taking part in the Great North Run next month in support of the Brain Tumour Research charity following the death of her dad on Valentine’s Day 2017.

Julie with her dad Ian Lowe, who sadly died last year.

Julie with her dad Ian Lowe, who sadly died last year.

The 31-year old is motivated by the fact that less than 20% of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years, compared with an average of 50% across all cancers.

Her dad Ian, a taxi driver from South Shields, was diagnosed with an aggressive central nervous system lymphoma after becoming very forgetful and collapsing in January 2017.

The treatment options for Ian were extremely bleak, and he died just two months later at the age of 56, a week after starting an antibody treatment.

Julie, a dental nurse at White Friars House Dental Practice in Chester, said: “I’ve never ran a half marathon before, but I’m really excited for the challenge.

I want to honour dad’s extraordinary bravery

Julie Lowe

“There have been a lot of early morning training sessions, and although it’s tough it’s a fantastic opportunity to raise money for a great cause.

“As I watched dad suffer, without complaining, I was struck by how awful brain tumours are.

“I want to honour his extraordinary bravery in the face of the cruellest illness and to support vital research into improved treatments and, ultimately, a cure.”

Joined by her partner Rich, Julie will be among thousands of runners taking part in the annual Great North Run, the world’s biggest half marathon.

A team of 42 will be taking part and raising money for Brain Tumour Research, which funds dedicated UK Centres of Excellence where scientists are focused on improving outcomes for patients and, ultimately, finding a cure.

Andrea Pankiw, community fundraising manager for Brain Tumour Research, said: “We are extremely grateful for Julie and Rich’s support and wish them all the best for the event. Ian’s story reminds us all that less than 20% of those diagnosed with a brain tumour survive beyond five years compared with an average of 50% across all cancers. We cannot allow this situation to continue.”

To sponsor Julie, visit www.justgiving.com/fundraising/julie-lowe14