Gust of wind led to Jarrow dad’s bike death crash

:Lee Gibson with his son Smith on holiday. Picture by FRANK REID
:Lee Gibson with his son Smith on holiday. Picture by FRANK REID

The uncle of a South Tyneside dad who was killed in a freak motorcycle accident has told how rode back to find his nephew fighting for his life at the side of the road.

Jonathan Caizley was one of three riders making their way along the A66 at Stainmore with Lee Gibson to watch the annual TT races in the Isle of Man.

Lee Gibson's coffin id=s carried into South Shields Crematorium.  Picture by FRANK REID

Lee Gibson's coffin id=s carried into South Shields Crematorium. Picture by FRANK REID

At an inquest in Cockermouth, Mr Caizley said pulled in to the side of the road when he could no longer see his nephew in his rear mirror.

He was then told by a passing motorist there had been an accident.

He made his way back to find Mr Gibson, 30, of Ullswater Avenue, Jarrow, on the road being treated by some off-duty paramedics.

An ambulance and air ambulance were called but Mr Caizley said that, a short time later, he was told his nephew had died.

For an experienced rider it was the worst conditions I’ve ever known.

Jonathan Caizley

Assistant Coroner for Cumbria, Dr Nicholas Shaw, concluded Mr Gibson died as the result of being blown off his bike by a gust of wind.

Mr Gibson, a mechanic, leaves a partner, Elaine Rea and two-year-old son, Smith.

Mr Caizley told the hearing there was a “massive wind pressure” during the trip and it was also raining.

He added: “The wind was catching you. You could feel it. You had to lean into the wind on your bike. For an experienced rider it was the worst conditions I’ve ever known.

“My initial thoughts were Lee could be stuck behind the HGVs.

“As a group of riders you just pull in and wait for them to catch up. It was a passing motorist who told us about the accident”

Earlier the trio had been forced to stop after Mr Gibson, a mechanic, suffered a puncture.

After it was fixed by the AA, Mr Gibson, who was travelling on his yellow BMW S1000RR bike, set the mashine’s controls to “rain mode” - which reduced its power.

Pathologist Dr. Fergus Young concluded Mr Gibson died from multiple injuries.

He said there were no traces of alcohol or drugs in his system apart from those used to treat him at the scene.

PC Dugald Cunningham, who carried out an investigation into the crash, said there was “furrowing” in the grass and damage to the barrier along the central reservation at the scene which showed evidence of the impact.

He said marks on the road surface were caused by stones trapped between the bike’s tyres and the tarmac while Mr. Gibson was braking as he tried to control his motorcycle.

The coroner concluded that Mr Gibson died as a result of a road traffic collision after he lost control when he was hit by a gust of wind.

*Story supplied by Cumberland & Westmorland Herald