People urged to get active to reduce risk of diabetes

Coun Alan Kerr wants people to take up the offer and get fit.
Coun Alan Kerr wants people to take up the offer and get fit.

South Tynesiders are being encouraged to become more active in a bid to reduce their risk of diabetes.

The council’s leisure centres are offering a special promotion today to mark World Diabetes Day.

Those who purchase the annual Get Active Discount or Get Active Plus Discount Cards can receive these at half price.

The cards, which are valid at all of the centres including Haven Point and Hebburn Central, offer a discounted rate on activities for anyone who does not want to commit to a direct debit membership but would benefit from being regular users of the facilities.

Cards are normally priced at £5.75 for an adult resident of South Tyneside and £7.80 for adult non-residents, resulting in a saving of £2.87 and £3.90. Junior cards for those under 18 are free.

South Shields Town Hall in Westoe Road will also be lit up blue today in bid to raise awareness of the condition, which affects 9,900 people in the borough.

Coun Alan Kerr, deputy leader at South Tyneside Council with responsibility for culture and leisure, said: “We hope that as many people as possible take up this fantastic promotion and use our first-class facilities at our leisure centres at Haven Point, Hebburn Central, Monkton Stadium, Temple Park and Jarrow Community Pool.

“There are lots of activities that you can take part in such as trying out various exercise classes, going to the gym and swimming. By offering this promotion we hope to raise awareness of diabetes, a growing problem, which is affecting more and more people throughout South Tyneside.

Lead member for public health and wellbeing, Coun Moira Smith, added: “You are more at risk of suffering from diabetes if you are overweight. That’s why a healthy diet and exercise are so important to help both lower your chances of developing this long-erm condition and managing it if you are diagnosed with it.

For more information about diabetes, visit www.diabetes.org.uk/risk.