Jarrow Zeppelin raid victims remembered 100 years on

The Mayor and Mayoress, Coun Richard Porthouse and his wife Patricia, lay a wreath in memory of those killed in a Zeppelin raid 100 years ago.
The Mayor and Mayoress, Coun Richard Porthouse and his wife Patricia, lay a wreath in memory of those killed in a Zeppelin raid 100 years ago.

The anniversary of a wartime tragedy which claimed the lives of people in South Tyneside has been marked with a special service.

This week marked 100 years since bombs were dropped in a Zeppelin airship raid over the River Tyne.

This was a tragic episode in the history of Jarrow

Coun Richard Porthouse

The attack led to the death of 16 shipyard workers, who had been building two warships. A further 72 people were injured.

It was also reported that Ann Elizabeth Laughlin, 62, who lived across the road from the yard, died of shock.

The service, in front of Jarrow Town Hall at the war memorial, was attended by the Mayor and Mayoress of South Tyneside, Coun Richard Porthouse and his wife Patricia.

Coun Porthouse said: “This was a tragic episode in the history of Jarrow and surrounding areas.

“It is important that 100 years on we honour the memories of those who lost their lives doing jobs that were vital to the war effort.”

Those killed in the raid were: Matthew Carter, 66, ship fitter; Joseph Thorneycroft, 31; John Windle, 22; William Turner, 20; Joseph Lane, 67; Robert Nixon, 32; Albert Bramley, 54; Thomas Smith, 23; Ralph Snaith; William Stamford; Karl Karlning, 24; Lawrence Sanderson, 16; William Young, 16; Frederick Pinnock, 29; George Ward and John Cuthbert Davison.

Three bombs were also dropped in South Shields the same night. A final bomb landed on the beach, but failed to explode.