Primark tops readers’ wish list for South Shields town centre – what do you want?

Former Streamline Garages site'365 regeneration plan in South Shields.'Picture by Jane Coltman
Former Streamline Garages site'365 regeneration plan in South Shields.'Picture by Jane Coltman

New supermarket plans for South Shields may have been halted – but the people of the town are dreaming of what else could take its place.

The plan to build a new supermarket at the back of Foler Street, South Shields – the final phase of the council’s £100million plan to revamp the town centre – have been put on hold.

Gazette readers have not been slow to come up with their ideas on which businesses they think are most needed in the town – and which stores they would most like to see set up a local branch.

The overwhelming majority called for a department store – with dozens saying their No1 shop of choice would be Primark.

Our online story got more than 70 comments from readers and 30 shares.

Some called for a “proper” department store such as Debenhams, House of Fraser or John Lewis, and others asked for particular shops, including one selling men’s clothes, and one for baby items.

Matalan, Marks & Spencer and the return of Binns were also popular choices.

Sue Powell said: “Primark is ideal for people who don’t have much money. You get good value for your money and it means the money would be spent in South Shields instead of Sunderland and Newcastle.”

Kelsie Paige Sinclair said: “Primark is one of the best retail stores and it doesn’t cost an arm and a leg to shop.”

She also suggested more stores for men, a good shoe shop, a baby store and craft shops.

Eileen Gray said: “Primark is what we need for clothes, bedding and household goods at affordable prices.”

Linda Robinson added: “Should never have got rid of Binns. We desperately need something. Shields town centre is dead. No M&S, no electrical shops, no furniture stores and we could do with a decent wallpaper and paint shop.”

Carol Thompson: “Our town centre is shocking. I come from a generation where the town was full of great shops and it was a time when people didn’t have a lot of money but somehow the shop were busy.

“Someone decided to pull all the old buildings down, and ripped the heart out of the town.”

Trevor Ord said: “No amount of comments will cause a major retailer of any description to rush to the town. They’ll come if and when it’s commercially viable for them to do so.”