Retired doctor continues his work through book on treatment of ill babies

Retired surgeon Ian Rogers with his book.
Retired surgeon Ian Rogers with his book.

A retired surgeon has written a book about a condition in infancy which could help treat babies across the world.

Ian Rogers, who was based at the Ingham Infirmary and South Tyneside District Hospital, hopes the book will help other medics as they offer care to children with pyloric stenosis.

I hope that it will help doctors and surgeons have a greater advantage in knowing about theses cases and understand the condition and the treatment available.

Ian Rogers

The condition is often mistaken for reflux and leads to vomiting in the first six weeks of life, with boys five times more likely to suffer than girls, first borns most commonly affected and evidence it can run in families.

It is caused by an enlarged sphincter muscle in the stomach, stopping it from emptying and can be diagnosed through an ultrasound.

It can prove fatal in its most serious cases and can require surgery, but can self-cure in minor instance, with acid-blocking drugs also a treatment option.

Money raised through his self-published book, Pyloric Stenosis of Infancy - The Great Mystery Unravels, will go to the Safe Water Trust, a South Tyneside-based charity which supplies clean water filters to Africa.

Dr Rogers, 75, who lives in Cleadon, said: “This is a subject I’ve been interested in since I was a student doctor.

“I hope that it will help doctors and surgeons have a greater advantage in knowing about theses cases and understand the condition and the treatment available.

“I think people should be more aware of this condition and diagnose it early on.”

Earlier this month, Dr Rogers led a presentation on the subject at a surgical meeting in Paris and is due to host another in London in September.

The book is for sale via Amazon for £15.