Five managers who returned to haunt Newcastle in their first reunion

GONE ... Sam Allardyce.
GONE ... Sam Allardyce.

AHEAD of Alan Pardew’s reunion with his old club tonight, we look at how former managers have returned to haunt Newcastle.

Pardew will not be the first manager looking to get one over on his former employers, and he will aim to emulate some of his St James’s Park predecessors while proving something of a point to those who called for his head near the end of his time at the club.

File photo dated 22/05/2013 of Former Tottenham Hotspur player Ossie Ardiles. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Friday June 28, 2013. Former Tottenham midfielder Ossie Ardiles says English football is in a "bad state" and must embrace revolutionary changes. See PA story SOCCER Ardiles. Photo credit should read: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

File photo dated 22/05/2013 of Former Tottenham Hotspur player Ossie Ardiles. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Friday June 28, 2013. Former Tottenham midfielder Ossie Ardiles says English football is in a "bad state" and must embrace revolutionary changes. See PA story SOCCER Ardiles. Photo credit should read: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

Take a look at these ex­-Magpie managers who returned to haunt their former club.

Kenny Dalglish

Liverpool 3­ Newcastle United 1; December 2011

It had been 13 years since Kenny Dalglish was sacked by Newcastle when he led Liverpool to a resounding 3­-1 victory over the Tyneside club in December 2011.

Kevin Keegan

Kevin Keegan

Despite an excellent start to the season, where the Magpies had gone the first 11 league games unbeaten, they had amassed just five points from a possible 21 going into the trip to Anfield.

The Reds, by contrast, had lost just three games all season but seven draws were wearing thin the patience of the Kop.

The away side were to draw first blood, when Daniel Agger turned in a Yohan Cabaye free­-kick after 25 minutes. However, a goal in either half from former Magpie Craig Bellamy put the Reds in front before Steven Gerrard stroked home the final nail in the coffin with 12 minutes to spare.

Sam Allardyce

Blackburn Rovers 3­ Newcastle United 0; January 2009

There is no mistaking the mirth and relief Sam Allardyce has taken from inflicting revenge upon his former employers, having felt aggrieved to have been relieved of his duties in January 2008 after just seven months at the helm.

The first man to experience a dismissal at the hands of Mike Ashley, the former Bolton Wanderers boss has since embarked on a personal crusade against the Magpies, amassing 14 points from a possible 18 against them.

The first reunion between Allardyce and the club who he had felt so mistreated by, with the supporters having derided his long­ ball tactics, came 12 months after his sacking.

A Benni McCarthy penalty, and a brace from Jason Roberts in the second half, subjected Joe Kinnear’s men to their ninth loss of the season, and plunged them even deeper into the relegation mire.

Big Sam has gone on to rebuild his career, and has been a constant thorn in the side of the Magpies over the last number of years. Point proven.

Kevin Keegan

Manchester City 1­ Newcastle United 0; May 2002

In a clash between a manager and the club whom he almost led to the Premiership title, it seemed almost fitting that this encounter was decided by a player he had once disposed of during his spell at St James’s Park.

Emotions ran high when Keegan, revered for his five­-year spell in charge of ‘The Entertainers’, prepared to face Newcastle for the first time since he had left the club in 1997.

Newcastle, who had finished fourth the previous season, travelled to the City of Manchester Stadium to face Keegan’s recently­ promoted outfit on the second matchday of the 02/03 season.

Debutant Peter Schmeichel made some important saves to keep Newcastle, and in particular Kieron Dyer, at bay but it was former Newcastle reject Darren Huckerby who proved to be the hero.

Having sold the winger six years earlier during their brief time together at Newcastle, Keegan reaped the rewards of that decision as Huckerby nodded home the winner before half-time.

Jim Smith

Derby County 1­ Newcastle United 0; December 1997

During his final months in charge, former Newcastle boss Jim Smith became embroiled in a power struggle with the Newcastle hierarchy, forced to rely on blooding youngsters into the first­ team amid a lack of financial trust in the transfer market.

Smith was forced to scour the continent for cut­-price players and loan signings in a bid to bolster his squad.

Unsurprisingly, he would describe the club as ‘unmanageable’ before tendering his resignation. Sound familiar?

Smith had arrived at the club at a tumultous time in the club’s history. Appointed in December 1988 with the club struggling at the foot of the First Division, he was unable to save them from relegation and they came close to achieving promotion the following season, but were thwarted by local rivals Sunderland in the play­-off semi­final.

Smith lasted just over two years at the club before resigning in March 1991.

The two didn’t cross paths for another four years, until Derby County achieved promotion in 1996, and he eventually recorded a win over his former employers the following year. The game was a dull and forgettable affair, with Stefano Eranio’s early penalty deciding the contest.

Newcastle’s attack, with the inefficient Jon Dahl Tomasson and Ian Rush toiling in Alan Shearer’s absence, was blunt and posed little threat to Mart Poom’s goal.

Ossie Ardiles

Newcastle United 0­ Tottenham 1; August 1993

Having become Newcastle’s first ever foreign manager when he accepted the post in March 1991, former Argentine World Cup winner Ardiles lasted less than a year in the job and was sacked with the club lying at the foot of the second division.

While Newcastle were revived under Kevin Keegan, Ardiles set about restoring his reputation first at West Brom, who he walked out on to join Spurs.

Ironically, his first game in charge was back at St James’s Park for Newcastle’s first game back in the top­ flight, and it ended in joy for the likeable Ossie when Teddy Sheringham struck after 36 minutes to silence the home crowd and take all three points back to London.

Ardiles wouldn’t fare much better at White Hart Lane, but his first game in charge of Tottenham was one to savour.