South Shields Camel Parade 2019: How the animals will be looked after as town prepares for festive event

There is little more than a week to wait until the South Shields Camel Parade, which each years draws scores of families to the town centre for an evening packed with festive fun.

Wednesday, 27th November 2019, 1:36 pm
Updated Thursday, 28th November 2019, 11:01 am

Ahead of the big night, which runs from 5pm until around 6.15pm, South Tyneside Council has issued a range of information for the public about the camels, how they are transported and what their conditions will be on their visit to South Shields.

We have got everything you need to know.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

The camels are coming to South Shields next week.

How will the camels be transported?

The camels will be transported in a lorry which has been specially adapted for them.

South Tyneside Council’s chosen camel supplier abides by the 2006 Animals in Welfare Transport Act, and holds an Animal Transport Certificate.

How will the camels be housed whilst at South Shields?

South Tyneside Council has released information about the camels and their welfare.

The camels will be held in a secure pen away from the public and, following the parade, they will be on display for a short while in a compound within the car park at Harbour Drive South.

On arrival, an experienced and qualified vet will inspect the animals and Environmental Health Officers will also be on site throughout the parade to ensure their health and wellbeing.

Will they have access to fresh drinking water and food ?

They will have access to food and water both on the lorry in transit and while in the display area.

Are the owners experienced and trained camel handlers?

The owners have more than 40 years of experience with camels and other large animals.

How are the camels looked after at home?

They spend the day in a 15-acre field and then are stabled at night.

The camel supplier is also a supported of the Wild Camel Protection Foundation.

What about the weather?

In the wild, camels are used to extremes of temperature and are able to withstand changes in body temperature and water consumption that most other animals could not.

Will the camels be distressed by the fireworks?

The camels will be leaving the seafront area ahead of the grand finale fireworks display.

Members of the public are not allowed to feed or pet the camels.