Shields Gazette readers back strict line on school uniform

Shields Gazette readers have backed strict rules on uniform as a means to maintain classroom discipline.

Monday, 2nd September 2019, 21:13 pm
Updated Tuesday, 3rd September 2019, 18:51 pm
Shields Gazette readers have backed a firm line on classroom discipline and school uniform

With youngsters across the country heading back to school after the six weeks summer holiday this week, we asked you “Are strict uniform policies necessary to tackle bad behaviour in schools?”

More than 900 people took part in our on-line poll and the result was a close ‘Yes.’

Fifty-two per cent of readers backed struct rules on uniform, with 48 per cent saying it was not necessary.

Emma Capaldi said: “Uniforms are very important in giving the kids a sense of belonging and pride. Having to follow rules can’t be a bad thing to teach kids! “What I don’t agree with is schools and companies making an absolute fortune on personalised logo items and overpriced clothing that is an essential for the uniform. “They should be promoting smart but affordable uniforms. Personalised/logo PE kits are too much!”

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Nikola Hunter thought wearing a uniform was good preparation for the workplace: “I think it sets them up for later in life.

“Whether or not employers provide a uniform, there'll be guidelines and a standard set out. I think uniform from an early age is a starting block for good behaviour and respect.”

But several readers thought a uniform was no substitute for a good example at home.

Mark Davison said: “Maybe disciplining the kids might help instead of all this freedom they seem to have now”, while Liz Anderson wriote: “ Think uniform is is great along side some discipline and manners and some respect from the home so when they go to school they can be educated to their capabilities.”

And Michael Grimes argued: “Uniforms are important in instilling pride in appearance, norms for roles later in life and conforming to basic prerequisite behaviours which will be more common in later life.

“As for behaviour, that’s a different avenue altogether. Practicing correct discipline these days is very difficult with teachers’ hands tied and a softer approach.”

Ben Rochester thought uniform was less important than the standard of teaching: Schools concentrate too much on what pupils looks like, rather than what they are teaching them.

“Teach them better and they will be educated enough to be dressed smartly.”

Nikki Patterson was also unconvinced: “I think uniform is important. And I'm glad its compulsory.

“But it doesn't affect behaviour! Nor does hairstyles!”

Donna Watson and Ian Askew thought uniforms were important to prevent bullying.

Donna said: “If kids could wear their own gear , could you imagine the bullying if one kid didn’t have the latest trainers, designer gear? Uniform is a great idea,” while Ian said: “Uniforms don’t stop or tackle bad behaviour. They do, however, stop fashion fads for poorer families.

“I think they are a good thing but could be cheaper.”