Your tip top South Tyneside lollipop men and women

Children being helped across the road by a lollipop man.
Children being helped across the road by a lollipop man.

The song My Boy Lollipop was a big hit for singer Millie Small in 1964.

And judging by the reaction to a recent Facebook posting of an old Gazette photo of a lollipop man and little ones here on South Tyneside, these iconic patrol men and women helped make some wonderful memories when they were assisting children to safely cross the road on their way to and from school.

Here, readers remember the lollipop men and women were made their mark on young minds.

Karen Baines recalls Edith Mason, “who used to be on Marsden Road and is now on Mortimer Road. The kids loved her (and the parents)”, to which Edith Mason responds, saying: “Aaaw thank you Karen, I miss seeing the bairns, but luckily I can catch up on FB and see how well they are all doing.”

Christina Walker gave a shout out to “John on Prince Edward Road. He was gutted when he became too ill to work and had to retire. Anyone know how he is doing?”

Eileen Ferguson had the answer, posting: “John still does the crossing on Stanhope Road/Ashley Road,” while Lynn Hannard Turnbull adds: “He’s doing really well.”

Helen R Goudie sang the praises of “John at Stanhope Road, always a smile for everyone”.

Another reader spoke of John Donnington, saying “lovely man, the gentlest soul in South Shields”.

Joanne Cobb said: “Auntie Ann, used to be on Mowbray Road helping the children from Mowbray Juniors and Westoe Infants to cross.”

Johannah Stephenson also recalls how “Auntie Anne, at Mowbray Road, going to Mowbray Junior’s, was a great woman”.

Doris Bellfield says: “She wasn’t my lollipop lady but I would have loved her to be – one of the kindest and caring person I’ve ever had the pleasure to have in my life.”

Eve Oakley took to social media to tell readers: “We had Mr Elrick on Prince Edward Road in the 60s, serving Harton Infants and Juniors. He was a lovely, kind, funny man and had lots of interactions with us.”

Hannah McAlister talks about “Aunty Jean at Sunderland Road during the 70s. ‘Come along, scholars!’”, while Tracie Cook is a fan of “Margaret, who used to be on Harton Lane next to All Saints Infants”.

When it comes to her top of the pops, Solain Watson had one in mind when she took to Facebook.

“Alison Wainman, she’s my all round favourite person,” explains Solain.

Phil Brown remembers Hayley Harrison while Kelly Roberts recalls Doris, at the top of Whiteleas Way – prompting Ashleigh Thomas to say “yeah Doris” and Emma Anderson to add “used to love Doris”.

Eve Oakley said: “Doris lived next door to my mam and dad for years.”

Clare Hampton spoke of Rosie who “used to be the lollipop lady outside of the Chi pub in 80s. Lovely cuddly woman who used to give us all mix-ups, loved her”.

Helen George remembers “Sally that did Finchale Road” while Sue Langton said “Arthur was mine when I went to Stanhope Road Junior School”.

Shelly Scott championed Issy Glass at Biddick Hall Juniors, something Sara Jane Bays agrees with, saying “she was lovely!” while Daniel Adams added “definitely Issy!”

Jamie Dunn was also a fan, posting “Issy, love her man!”

Ann Wilson took time to mention Mr Brennan, at Biddick Hall Juniors, prompting Angela Reay to say “legend that man. Loved him – remember like it was yesterday”.

Mick Johnson, meanwhile saluted “the two Carols on Ocean Road”, while Suze Smith spoke of Margaret at Jarrow Cross Primary School”.

Such comments speak loudly about the affection and respect that many people feel for these dedicated lollipop men and women who turn out in all weathers, morning, lunchtime and home-time, to help pupils stay safe when crossing the road.

Who was your favourite school crossing patrol man or woman?

Perhaps you were one of them, please get in touch with your memories.