Brexit vote: How did MPs in the South Shields area vote and what happens next?

New Prime Minister Boris Johnson suffered a humiliating defeat in the House of Commons on Tuesday night as MPS voted to take control of Parliamentary business in an attempt to halt the prospect of a no-deal Brexit.

Wednesday, 4th September 2019, 09:06 am
Updated Wednesday, 4th September 2019, 10:08 am
MPs announce the outcome of the crucial House of Commons Brexit vote on Tuesday night.

Labour MPs Emma Lewell-Buck (South Shields) and Stephen Hepburn (Jarrow) were among the 328 supporters of Tuesday night's successful motion. But what is likely to happen next?

What will MPs debate on Wednesday?

The legislation put forward by a cross-party group, led by the Labour MP and Brexit Select Committee chairman Hilary Benn and Tory former Foreign Office minister Alistair Burt, would require a delay to Brexit unless there was a deal or Parliament explicitly backed leaving the EU without one by October 19.

The snappily-titled European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 6) Bill 2019 also has the support of former Cabinet minsters Philip Hammond and David Gauke.

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Under the terms of the Bill, the Government must ask the European Union for a delay to Brexit until January 31, 2020, if no agreement has been reached and MPs have not agreed to a no-deal exit.

If the European Council proposes an extension to a different date then the Prime Minister must accept that extension within two days unless the House of Commons rejects it.

What will happen then?

For the Bill to become law, it must clear all stages in the Commons before heading to the House of Lords for further scrutiny.

The process usually takes weeks, but it could be hurried through in as little as three days to be passed before Parliament is prorogued next week.

However this will not be straightforward: MPs could defeat the Bill, or peers could attempt to block its passage by talking it out.

Will there be an election?

Boris Johnson said he would seek to trigger a snap general election after losing the vote.

The motion would require the support of two-thirds of MPs under the provisions of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act, but Labour indicated that they would not support the move until chances of a no-deal Brexit were taken off the table.

If the motion is tabled, it is likely this will be debated on Wednesday.

While Labour's refusal to back it would limit the likelihood of Mr Johnson's motion succeeding, other avenues remain open to the Prime Minister to push for a poll - including triggering a confidence motion in his own Government.