Day of reflection in South Tyneside to mark a year since the first lockdown began - here's how to show your colours

People in South Tyneside are being encouraged to support a national day of reflection on the anniversary of the first UK lockdown.

Thursday, 18th March 2021, 4:58 pm
Updated Friday, 19th March 2021, 10:26 am
South Shields town hall will be lit yellow as part of the day of reflection
South Shields town hall will be lit yellow as part of the day of reflection

Organised by charity Marie Curie, the day of reflection, on 23 March, encourages people to remember those who have lost their lives to Covid-19 and offer support to those bereaved while also hoping for a brighter future.

The Deputy Mayor of South Tyneside, Councillor Gladys Hobson, is inviting people across the borough to take part in a minute’s silence at 12noon on Tuesday March 23.

Residents are also encouraged to show their support by putting a colourful poster in a window or by shining a light at 8pm as a symbol of hope.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

Deputy Mayor of South Tyneside, Councillor Gladys Hobson, is inviting people across the Borough to take part in a minute’s silence at 12noon on March 23.

South Shields town hall will be lit up at 8pm in yellow - the colour of the Marie Curie charity.

Councillor Hobson, said: “The past year has, without doubt, been one of the most challenging for our communities. It has been a year like no other, a year in which many of us will have been affected by Covid or know someone who has been affected.

“This day of reflection is important as it allows us to stand together, reflect on our collective loss but also look forward to a brighter future.”

She added: “It is a time to also remember all those who were there for us in our darkest of days. It is important that we hold in our memory all the people who went above and beyond throughout this crisis. From our wonderful NHS staff to teachers, social care workers and our army of volunteers, to name but a few, those who really needed our support continued to receive it.

“Sadly we are not yet done with Covid but this day will focus our minds on the tremendous efforts everyone has made in the fight against the virus and remind us of the need to continue to follow the guidance.

“By continuing to work together as a community we will prevail.”

Marie Curie chief executive Matthew Reed said the end-of-life charity, together with more than a hundred care organisations, charities, businesses, membership organisations, emergency services, public sector bodies and community groups are asking the nation to take a 'minute to reflect and a moment to connect', to remember, grieve for and celebrate the life of anyone who has died during the last year and to show solidarity for the millions of people who have been bereaved.

“We need to take a moment to mark the huge amount of loss we've seen in the past 12 months and show support for everyone who has been bereaved – be that from covid or any other cause. Many people are in shock, confused, upset, angry and unable to process what has happened. But there is an overwhelming need to come together, to remember, to grieve, to celebrate.

"On 23 March, we invite everyone join together to hold a minute's silence at 12noon, take a moment to reach out to someone they know is grieving, and shine a light at 8pm."

The charity, renowned for its annual Great Daffodil Appeal in March, hopes that the National Day of Reflection will become an annual event.

Support your Gazette and become a subscriber today. Enjoy unlimited access to local news, the latest football stories and new puzzles every day. With a digital subscription, you can see fewer ads, enjoy faster load times, and get access to exclusive newsletters and content. Click here to subscribe.