Rosiefest set for a new venue following demolition of The Rose and Crown in South Shields

The organiser of the popular Rosiefest in South Shields has said that the event will find a new home following the demolition of the town’s beloved pub, the Rose and Crown.

Thursday, 4th July 2019, 16:30 pm
Updated Wednesday, 3rd July 2019, 16:44 pm
Natalie Lacselles (kneeling front) is hosting her final Rosie Fest event at The Holborn Rose and Crown, South Shields. Pictured with Natalie are l-r members of headliners Rivelino, Graham Todd, Neil Todd and Barry Pike, manager at the Rose and Crown Karen McKellar, singer Jen Stevens, Pat and Mick Lacselles.

The annual music event, which has raised more than £20,000 for charity, has been hosted by the historic pub for the last seven years, with hundreds of residents attending.

It is due to be held at the Victorian-era venue, on Hill Street in South Shields for the last time on Saturday, July 6, before the pub is demolished at the end of the summer.

The Holborn Rose and Crown, Hill Street, South Shields

However, now Rosiefest organiser Natalie Lascelles, from South Shields, has said she will continue to put on the festival in future years, as it continues to grow in popularity – and she is on the lookout for a new venue.

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“I’ve already had a few pubs approach me, but I’m going to be choosy,” she said.

“My goal would be to get somewhere like Gypsies Green where we can have lots of proper bars and raise a lot of money for charities. It’s just to have something on in South Shields for people.”

Natalie launched the event seven years ago as a way of dealing with the anxiety and depression she was experiencing at the time. She has since raised thousands for South Shields causes, such as Cancer Connections, Impact and The Charlie and Carter Cookson Foundation, while also increasing awareness of mental health issues.

Demolition plans for The Holborn Rose and Crown, Hill Street, South Shields

She said: “Everyone is lovely, they go off and do their own little fundraisers and want to do something. Some people just come down to make a donation.

“It helps people who have been affected [by cancer]. They feel so good about themselves that they have helped someone, which is why I started it in the first place.”

This year is set to be Rosiefest’s biggest yet, as around 700 residents prepare to give the Victorian-era pub the send-off it deserves.

Speaking about the closure of the pub Natalie said: “We’re just devastated, we really are, but we’re looking forward to it because we know it’s going to be a really good day.”

Rosiefest will be held at The Rose and Crown on Saturday, July 6 from 2pm.