South Shields MP Emma Lewell-Buck calls on constituents to 'stand with her' as she vows to fight for her seat in reselection vote

South Shields MP Emma Lewell-Buck has said she will fight for her seat following the vote for a trigger ballot in the constituency.

Tuesday, 8th October 2019, 5:45 pm
Updated Tuesday, 8th October 2019, 6:25 pm
South Shields MP, Emma Lewell-Buck vows to fight for her seat as she faces reselection vote.

Labour Party members are in the process of voting in a trigger ballot to determine whether the MP can be challenged by rival candidates in the party ahead of the next General Election.

In response, Ms Lewell-Buck posted a statement on her Twitter page on Tuesday, October 8, saying she will continue to fight for her constituency and urging her supporters not to give up on the party.

The Labour MP wrote: “To all of the South Shields Labour Party members who have contacted me to say they are leaving our party, please don’t. I need you to stand with me. To all of my lovely constituents who have sent messages of support thank you, I will never let you down.”

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Ms Lewell-Buck continued: “Complaints about the behaviour of my Constituency Labour Party have been a constant for many years.

“If it were not for the overwhelming levels of support I receive every day from local people I would have given up long ago.

“I cannot overstate the pride I feel in being the MP for South Shields representing my home and the people I dearly love, respect and admire. I am also immensely proud to be representing them as a Labour MP.”

She will need to gain the backing of two-thirds of wards and affiliate branches to stand unopposed.

A spokesperson for the Labour Party in South Tyneside said: “It’s a democratic process, so that like councillors, MPs face a reselection and don’t automatically have their seat, so that if others want a chance at becoming an MP then they can do. That’s all it is, no more, no less.”

The nationwide trigger ballot process was introduced before the 1992 General Election and applies to sitting Labour MPs rather than candidates fighting seats held by other parties.